Gluten-free eating: Pizza-style Socca

Caroline

Food writer. Broadcaster. Blogger. Author. Married to Eight Degrees Brewing. Member of the Irish Food Writers’ Guild, founder of Irish Food Bloggers Association and co-author of Sláinte: The Complete Guide to Irish Craft Beer & Cider (New Island)

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6 Responses

  1. Daniela says:

    Hi Caroline,I am an avid (lunchbreak) reader of Bibliocook and today I am especially delighted to read your article on gluten free food. As a coeliac foodie(with corn and wheat allergy) I am always trying out new recipes which don’t involve just opening a bag of Tritamyl flour and are tasty enough for non-coeliac husband and guests. Will try your recipe and report back… Thanks again, Daniela

  2. Caroline says:

    I know what you mean, Daniela. In a world where pasta reigns, it’s sometimes difficult to find alternatives – but they are out there! And this recipe is so versatile. Mark Bittman’s version had no topping, he just served it plain as a nibble with drinks – great for anyone who’s also dairy intolerant – and you could also add spices or herbs to the batter to flavour it. If you’re having problems finding chickpea flour at your local Indian or Middle Eastern shop, check the labels carefully – I’ve also seen it sold as garm flour, chana or besan and, of course, chickpeas in American are known as garbanzos so watch out for that name variation too. Good luck and please do let me know how you get on.

  3. Andrea says:

    I also hate fussy people (only when I have to cook fro them really) as I hate the thought that I cant cook whatever takes my fancy that day/night. Love the sound of these flatbreads, have heard of them before & funnily I have some chickpea flour sitting in the cupboard that needs using so will have to bang em out soon!

  4. Caroline says:

    And bang ’em out you will – so easy and tasty! How come you have chickpea flour sitting around? It’s not something that you expect to find usually in a kitchen!

  5. Maj says:

    Hi there,I’m pretty new to all this gf stuff. Just wondering if chorizo is definitely safe?Maj

  6. Caroline says:

    That’s a really good question, Maj. You just had me digging through the rubbish bin, looking for the wrapper of the chorizo that we ate last night! And you’re absolutly right to check. Looking through the ingredients, I see that the chorizo – a brand called Sol that I picked up in Dunnes Stores – contains dextrin which MAY NOT be safe for coeliacs. There’s more about it on this page from Celiac.com so, as with all special diets, it’s always best to double check the label before you eat it. Sorry if I mis-led you Maj.

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